Quick Answer: Why Do Cockneys Call A Watch A Kettle?

What is Jack and Danny slang for?

There’s also the unfortunate coincidence that ‘Jack and Dani’ means something a little rude in Cockney rhyming slang – a dialect Danny is very familiar with.

“Jack and Dani means something in Cockney rhyming slang…..

Fanny.

It means fanny.”.

What is a dry lunch in slang?

dry lunch (plural dry lunches) (England, slang) A contemptible or uncool person.

Why are girls called Birds?

it’s actually from burd a romantic term for a young lady, first used in poetry in the 1300’s it was used, mainly in the sixties, and only in jest today.

What is cockney slang kettle?

Kettle and Hob is Cockney slang for Watch. “Nice new Kettle you’re wearing mate.” … Kettle is the shortened form of Kettle and Hob – think of the oven range in an old fashioned house, with its kettle boiling away on the hob.

What is cockney slang for brother?

One and t’OtherOne and t’Other is Cockney slang for Brother.

What does butcher’s mean in Cockney?

Butcher’s Hook is Cockney slang for Look. “Give us a Butcher’s at your paper mate.” Butcher’s Hook means “Look” in Cockney Rhyming Slang. Butcher’s Hook is used across London and beyond, and widely understood throughout the UK. It’s classic Cockney Rhyming Slang.

Why is a belly called a derby?

On boiled beef and carrots. “Derby Kell” is old Cockney rhyming slang for belly (“Derby Kelly”). … It uses the word ‘kite’ (also ‘kyte’), a dialect word, originally derived from an Old English word for the womb which, by extension, came to mean the belly.

What does lemon mean in Cockney slang?

In Cockney rhyming slang, it means Smart. Lemon Tart = Smart. You could say, “Don’t get lemon (with me)” But most people don’t use the word Lemon for smart anymore. It’s more used to call someone an idiot.

Why are glasses called bins?

Why are spectacles called bins? On the subject of ‘bins’ this expression is the cockney rhyming slang for glasses, as in reading glasses, so if someone is having trouble looking up a number in a telephone book you might say put on your ‘bins’.

Why is a safe called a Peter?

Peter is slang for ‘safe’, as in money box. The origin of the word is unclear. … Others say it comes from the Cockney rhyming slang Peter Pan = can, where ‘can’ could mean ‘safe’ or ‘prison cell’ – both safes and prison cells are enclosed spaces and need to be hard to break into/out of.

Why do Cockneys call a house a drum?

Originally Answered: Why is a person’s home a ‘drum’ in cockney rhyming slang? Place in the meaning of room or home. “Are we going to your drum, or mine?” That’s a modern repurposing of the earlier slang that either meant “to burgle” (To get into somewhere that was tight as a drum) or prison cell (Same root).

What is a carpet in Cockney slang?

carpet = three pounds (£3) or three hundred pounds (£300), or sometimes thirty pounds (£30). … The term has since the early 1900s been used by bookmakers and horse-racing, where carpet refers to odds of three-to-one, and in car dealing, where it refers to an amount of £300.

What does Dicky mean in Cockney?

(Cockney rhyming slang) Dicky dirt = a shirt, meaning a shirt with a collar. A detachable shirt front, collar or bib. (slang, dated) A hat, especially (in the US) a stiff hat or derby, and (in the UK) a straw hat.

What does Kettled mean?

Kettling (also known as containment or corralling) is a police tactic for controlling large crowds during demonstrations or protests. It involves the formation of large cordons of police officers who then move to contain a crowd within a limited area.

What does Kermit mean in cockney rhyming slang?

RoadKermit is Cockney slang for Road.

What does Tom mean in cockney rhyming slang?

Rhyming slang for “tart”

What is a Jimmy in Cockney slang?

Noun. Jimmy Riddle (plural Jimmy Riddles) (Cockney rhyming slang) A piddle; an act of urination.

Why is 500 a monkey?

Derived from the 500 rupee banknote, which featured a monkey. Explanation: While this London-centric slang is entirely British, it actually stems from 19th century India. … Referring to £500, this term is derived from the Indian 500 rupee note of that era, which featured a monkey on one side.

What does Nesh mean in British slang?

Nesh is an English dialect adjective meaning ‘unusually susceptible to cold weather’ and there is no synonym for this use. … Nesh was added, in 2011, to the British Library ‘wordbank’, a project to preserve regional dialect words and phrases.